Games Workshop has kindly sent me a C’Tan Shard of the Void Dragon to paint and I thought it’d be cool to give the kit a review and share my thoughts with you. He’s up for pre-order today (17th October 2020) and will be released on Saturday 24th October. Check out my review plus some spectacular photos after the jump.


Features
The model comes in a nice sized cardboard box, the box isn’t very deep and feels quite light. The box art is stunning with a really dramatic photo on the front. The back of the box shows the model and some close ups. It also shows you the different head options. Inside the box there is a single large plastic sprue and an 80mm base, and a coloured assembly instruction and rules booklet.
6/10


Accessibility
Games Workshop assembly instructions seem to be hit and miss, they are now full colour, printed on nice paper and easy to follow with digital graphics of each assembly step. The problem is the errors. I’ve had errors in quite a few instructions recently and this one is no different. Two of the numbers in the instructions don’t marry up with the numbers with the sprue (it’s the legs). It was easy to work out and correct but I wish they would proof check the instructions more thoroughly.

This model is a mainline release and will be available from third party stores and Games Workshop stores as well as online stones. It’s not a limited edition model or a promotional miniature so no problems with availability. 
9/10


Options 
There are 3 head options included in this set which is cool, so you can personalise your Void Dragon how you want. But that’s it. No weapon options or alternative builds. I kind of feel like Games Workshop have missed a trick here. There could have been a kit similar to the Bloodthirster of Vermin Lord where one kit can build a variety of different deities. Would have been cool to get a C’tan set with enough options to build 3 or 4 different C’tan.
6/10




Fun factor

This model is a lot of fun to build and paint! I had such a blast assembling the model into a series of sub-assemblies and painting each section before finally gluing it altogether and seeing it as completed piece. The model is such a nice display piece and steals the show on any shelf (or gaming table). There was a lot of fun figuring out how to translate my Necron scheme into something that would work on something as different as a captured C’Tan shard. The C’tan predate the Necrons Metallic forms and aren’t actually part of the Necron race. They’re enslaved to the Necrons, so I wanted mine to look different but still fit in with the army. I’m really pleased with how well it came out.
As for gaming fun, I haven’t used it, so I can’t really comment, but I can say I cant wait to unleash it in a game.
10/10

Value
RRP is £68. Which I feel is a bit much for what you get. The Stormcast Celestant Prime which is another large free floating model supported by flowing ethereal powers is only £50 and I feel that price is a better reflection. Both are single pose with no weapon options. £68 puts the C’Tan in a price bracket that is more than a start collecting set.
5/10


Conclusion
I’ve been a little tough on the Void Dragon in this review but I think you’ll be shocked to know I whole-heartedly recommend it. It’s an amazing model and models like this don’t come around all too often. It’s an engineering masterpiece coupled with renaissance art aesthetics. It’s just incredible. It’s dynamic, it’s alien, it’s threatening, it’s powerful, it’s angelic, it’s electrifying... it’s just amazing. Get one, you won’t regret it.
9/10



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